Saturday, March 25, 2017

After puppy dropped off bridge, a vets advice on adopting abused dogs; Humboldt’s Last Week of news


In the latest episode of Humboldt Last Week: While some are still discussing this emotional rollercoaster of events where a puppy was dropped off the Samoa Bridge and then adopted by one of the fishing crew members that rescued her, a local veterinarian shared some advice on adopting traumatized dogs.

“...The good thing to know is that dogs primarily live in the moment, unlike us humans who constantly relive our past and worry about the future,” said Dr. Susan Burden of the Sunny Brae Animal Clinic. “So it's best to not forever label any dog as a victim. Yes, absolutely dogs can develop negative associations from traumatic experiences which lead to fearful or anxious behaviors. You need to be aware of this and immediately address any behavioral issues that should happen. Seek the help of your veterinarian or animal behaviorist if needed. But if you forever feel bad for that dog, that dog will feel it too. Dogs pick up on nonverbal communication really well. So just provide the obvious -- food, water, and shelter -- with lots of positive reinforcement like belly rubs, playtime, chew toys, and treats to reward good behavior.”

There are too many pups locally that need loving homes. You can adopt dogs in Humboldt County via the Humboldt County Animal Shelter, Sequoia Humane Society, Miranda’s Rescue, Humboldt Craigslist, the Greater Rural Rescue Society, the Companion Animal Foundation, and more.

The story begins at 7:31.

Also covered: The witness of a alleged murder in Manila surprisingly said the shooter was a different person than she originally identified, new zoo prices, the Atlanta Falcons new fullback who played for Eureka, a tuition raise for HSU, Fortuna says no to commercial pot, the Eureka Police Chief on bias, the Ferndale High School basketball team got a shout-out from ESPN on twitter, high lead poisoning rates for Eureka kids, displaces businesses in Eureka, and more.


Saturday, March 18, 2017

SpongeBob creator and HSU grad diagnosed with ALS; Humboldt’s Last Week of news


In the latest episode of Humboldt Last Week: Love and positive thoughts from the North Coast are being sent out to Stephen Hillenburg, an HSU graduate and the creator of “SpongeBob SquarePants.” According to his statement released by Variety the 55-year-old has been diagnosed with ALS. He intends to continue his work on the series for as long as he is able.

“My family and I are grateful for the outpouring of love and support,” reads the statement. “We ask that our sincere request for privacy be honored during this time.”

Stephen graduated from HSU in 1984 with a marine-science major and art minor. He pitched his show idea to Nickelodeon in 1996 and the series premiered in 1999. As of 2015 the Emmy award-winning show has generated over $12 billion in merchandising revenue for Nickelodeon, according to Bloomberg. Among other generous efforts his foundation United Plankton helped fund renovations to the HSU Marine Lab.

"When I remember my time in Humboldt, I remember rain, Top Ramen, and the library,” he said. “I'm kidding, but the rain is significant because without it there would be no redwoods. Humboldt has incredibly rigorous science programs. It has dedicated teachers and students. Fortunately for me the school is not only surrounded by redwood forests, but it sits along an incredible part of the California coast. There are bays, estuaries, undeveloped coastline and open ocean and, of course, HSU utilizes the availability of these resources in their courses. One time my biology class went into the mountains to collect stream organisms. We were collecting insects in this tiny stream and under this rock we found a three-foot lamprey eel… I wouldn't hesitate to recommend going (to HSU).”

A few years back I interviewed Stephen about his experiences in Humboldt County.

In the audio more quotes from the interview with Stephen are shared. The story begins at 6:51.

ALS, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is a terminal illness that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. There is no cure but in some cases those that have it can live for a long time -- Stephen Hawking was diagnosed with the same illness in 1963. Some may remember the viral “ALS Ice Bucket Challenge” which raised well over a hundred millions dollars for the ALS Association. “The Association builds hope and enhances quality of life while aggressively searching for new treatments and a cure,” according to their website.

Also covered: An airport update, a Humboldt-born TV dog (pictured below), lighthouse leeway, the Sheriff on immigration, a puppy dropped from a bridge, court cases, school lock-downs, and much more.


Stephen Hillenburg



Image: Anoop Kumar


















Saturday, March 11, 2017

Are local stores doing enough to keep kids from alcohol and cigarettes? Humboldt’s last week of news

In the latest episode of Humboldt Last Week: The state released survey results that show Humboldt County kids might have more access to unhealthy products than the California average. That is, the availability and marketing of things like cigarettes, booze, and junk food to young people. 70 stores in the county that sell tobacco were surveyed.

Some of the results? A majority of the stores have booze at kid height or near candy and toys, a majority have candy-esque flavored alcohol, every single store had flavored Swisher Sweets cigars for less than a buck, a majority advertise unhealthy items, and only a third sell fruits and vegetables. About a third of Humboldt 11th graders binge drink -- almost twice the California average of 18 percent. And around 23 percent of Humboldt 11th graders use tobacco compared to the state average of 14 percent.

KIEM put out a poll that asked “would you like to see North Coast stores offer more healthy items?” 69 percent of viewers said yes and 21 percent said no.

Local store owners are tasked with choosing which items to sell, where to put those items, and how to advertise those items. Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services Health Education Specialist Jay McCubbrey was asked what advice he would have for store owners looking to both achieve viable sales numbers while at the same time provide kids healthier direction.

“Buying habits change over time, with younger people paying more attention to healthy alternatives,” he said. “We’re hoping that as this trend continues, carrying healthier foods will make better business sense for local retailers.”

Also there’s the part of the Humboldt community that already make healthy choices. The aforementioned survey only took into account stores that sell cigarettes, not places that don’t sell tobacco like the North Coast Co-op, Eureka Natural Foods, Wildberries Marketplace, Chautauqua Natural Foods, farmers markets or even CVS who took a hard stance against selling tobacco despite how profitable it is.

“We’ve always taken pride in the knowledge base our younger patrons have,” said Cassie Blom, Marketing Director for the North Coast Co-op. “...We make purchasing and merchandising decisions that allow for healthy choices -- for example, we don’t merchandise candy at our check stands. At the same time, we’re very careful not to dictate values to our shoppers, nor do we make claims about any dietary choices being better than others. We feel our role is to be a resource, provide information to our community, provide a variety of options, and let our shoppers choose what is best for their own health and lifestyle.”

The story begins at 10:01.

Also covered: Cannabis and canines, an Iranian HSU student’s experiences, the future of Humboldt healthcare coverage, iTunes gift cons, PG&Easy on my bill, donate to a family after a tragedy north of Orleans, county unable to rip fart joke, body image, avoiding DIY braces, and much more.



Monday, March 6, 2017

Skunk Train now offering ‘locals discount’ to Humboldt; Humboldt’s last week of news


The California Western Railroad -- also known as the Skunk Train -- will increase its spray radius for local discounts. Humboldt and Lake Counties can now receive the ‘Local Discount’ that Mendocino has been enjoying.
The discounted price for trips out of Willits is $35 for adults and $20 for kids, and then out of Fort Bragg it’ll be $15 for adults and $10 for kids.
A rep for the Skunk Train said those wanting to take advantage of the savings would just need to provide an ID that indicates a Humboldt County address. For advance tickets the discount cannot be applied online at this time, so you’ll have to call (707) 964-6371.
The railroad was originally built in 1885.
The story begins at 8:11.
Also covered: A filmmaker discusses his upcoming documentary about the Eel River, Eureka cops will host a gun buy-back and security expo, a Humboldt solar sinsemilla organization gets a nod in the Sac Bee, legal fees were paid to a widow, less flights at the airport, a life-saving opiate overdose drug is available via HACHR, a cannabis business park in Rio Dell, the Weott Fire Department disbands, more adoptable pups, we can play some soccer, the Skunk Train is offering their ‘local discount’ to Humboldt residents now, and much more.
Photo courtesy of Bruce Fingerhood

Saturday, March 4, 2017

Fall film explores if weed and wine will ruin the Eel River; Humboldt’s last week of news


In the latest episode of Humboldt Last Week: A trailer was recently released for an upcoming feature-length film called “A River’s Last Chance.” Set to come out this fall, the documentary explores if our Eel River and the fish within will hold up against droughts, floods, a restrictive dam, and thirsty weed and wine industries.
“It’s a river that gave me hope from its comeback story,” said filmmaker Shane Anderson, who spent the last six months in and around Humboldt County filming. “Especially being so abused during the industrial revolution and the 1964 flood -- being able to come back and return to such abundance, I really haven’t encountered any other river like it. It gave me faith in nature and nature’s resilience to come back from some of the most abusive land use practices.”
The award-winning producer and former HSU student believes among other things the regulation of a legal marijuana industry, responsible farming, and productive changes at the Scott Dam will help preserve the Eel River. He mentioned stakeholders are beginning to work next month to federally relicense the dam by 2022.
Anderson is a former pro skier who lived in Humboldt County for around five years before returning to his home of Olympia, Wash. in 2012. He used to compete in the X Games and spent many years living in Malibu at his friend Daryl Hannah’s property -- he’s collaborated on documentaries with her. He worked in Los Angeles on commercials and music videos before delving into feature-length documentaries.
This fall Anderson will bring “A River’s Last Chance” to the film festival circuit and host a number of screenings throughout our region, hoping to start a dialogue about living more “symbiotically with our watersheds so we can have ecology and economies.”
The story begins at 8:40.
Also covered: Eureka cops will host a gun buy-back and security expo, a Humboldt solar sinsemilla organization gets a nod in the Sac Bee, legal fees were paid to a widow, less flights at the airport, a life-saving opiate overdose drug is available via HACHR, a cannabis business park in Rio Dell, the Weott Fire Department disbands, more adoptable pups, we can play some soccer, the Skunk Train is offering their ‘local discount’ to Humboldt residents now, and much more.
Shane Anderson, photo by Jason Hartwick


Shane Anderson, photo by Jason Hartwick