Monday, June 26, 2017

[Audio] Interview with man who saved girl from exorcism, possible murder; Humboldt’s last week of news

Episode sponsored by Adventure’s Edge, Eel River Brewing and Bongo Boy Studio.

In the latest episode of Humboldt Last Week (7:28): An interview with John Marciel who likely saved a child’s life after intervening when her mother was “trying to remove the demons” from her at Centerville Beach near Ferndale.

The sheriff’s office says the mom stripped the 11-year-old girl naked and was shoving handfuls of sand in the her eyes and mouth. She allegedly also hit the girl with driftwood and struck, bit, and choked her. This girl was flown to a hospital out of the area and needed reconstructive surgery. John Marciel witnessed this while it was happening, intervened, and probably saved the girl’s life.

“(The emergency responders were) awesome,” he said. “(They’re) my heros. They put their lives on the line every single day that they get up and go to work for us. They are just completely awesome men and women… I feel that they should be more nominated for (awards) than I am.”

The Times Standard reported the 45-year-old mother, Kimberley Felder, pleaded not guilty to attempted murder. Felder was reportedly going through a divorce and was trying to get custody of her three daughters. She was also possibly going on and off meds for depression.

The story begins at 7:28.

Also covered

A grandma was arrested for leaving her two-year-old granddaughter in a hot car in the Bear River Casino parking lot for about 40 minutes while she gambled inside, the cowboy-hat criminal, imposters, an amazing foster family, the new all-inclusive scout group, Humboldt’s Cheech and Chong shoutout, cannabis country crooning, and much more.


John Marciel

Saturday, June 24, 2017

Unresponsive toddler found in hot car ‘underneath a blanket’ while grandma gambled; Humboldt’s last week of news

Episode sponsored by Adventure’s Edge, Eel River Brewing and Bongo Boy Studio.

In the latest episode of Humboldt Last Week (11:03): A grandma was arrested for leaving her two-year-old granddaughter in a hot car in the Bear River Casino parking lot for about 40 minutes while she gambled inside. It’s now been noted among other disturbing details that the child was not only unresponsive but also hidden “underneath a blanket” in the vehicle.

“...a security supervisor noticed a vehicle that is known for containing unattended minors on our property,” reads part of a report shared by Bear River Casino Director of Casino Operations Joe Claus. “The patron had been banned in the past for similar activity. Out of concern there could be an unattended child in the vehicle he went to check on the vehicle… he observed a small child, approximately two years of age, hidden underneath a blanket in the back seat.”

In the podcast information is shared about the condition of the toddler when they found her, a confirmation from the Sheriff’s Office about the child’s hospital status, what else security staff saw in the vehicle, the grandma’s court update, how kids aren’t built for heat, unconfirmed rumors of similar infractions by family members of the suspect, the state laws regarding leaving children in cars, how Child Welfare Services works to help families in similar situations, how heatstroke is also a concern for animals in hot cars, and more.

Thankfully Bear River Casino staff was able see what was going on and notify emergency responders in time to likely save this little girl’s life.

The story begins at 11:03.

Also covered

An interview with John Marciel who likely saved a child’s life after intervening when her mother was “trying to remove the demons” from her at the beach, the cowboy-hat criminal, imposters, an amazing foster family, the new all-inclusive scout group, Humboldt’s Cheech and Chong shout-out, cannabis country crooning, and much more.

Kathryn Perri, the child's grandmother. Booking photo.
Bear River Casino. Photo: Myles Cochrane

Saturday, June 17, 2017

Law professor analyzes Arcata stabbing developments; Humboldt’s last week of news

Episode sponsored by Adventure’s Edge, Eel River Brewing and Bongo Boy Studio.
 In the latest episode of Humboldt Last Week (9:44): A law professor recently analyzed potential charging developments in the tragic stabbing death of 19 year old HSU student David Josiah Lawson. North Coast Journal Editor Thadeus Greenson had the story.

Lawson lost his life at a house party in Arcata on April 15. With an estimated 100 party attendees there were reportedly a number of altercations that occurred that night possibly over a missing cell phone.

The family of 23 year old McKinleyville resident Kyle Zoellner, the former murder suspect who saw charges dropped due to a lack of evidence, has been pushing for assault charges against other party attendees. They believe Zoellner was beaten unconscious by a number of young men before Lawson was stabbed.

“He explained that none of these things can really be seen in a vacuum,” said Greeson who interviewed California Hastings College of Law professor David Levine about the impacts additional assault charges may have on obtaining justice for Josiah. “Any decision that prosecutors or police make regarding other lesser offenses -- assault charges and stuff like that -- related to people that were there that night, could impact ultimately their ability to successfully charge prosecute whoever actually killed Josiah Lawson...”

In the podcast Greenson discusses Levine’s comments on the the two main approaches the Arcata Police Department and District Attorney’s Office could take. He also discusses the Zoellner family’s response to his article and a misconception some had earlier about the case.

A lot is still unknown. Those involved so far have not been able to agree on whether or not racism played a role in Lawson’s death. They also can’t agree on how these fights started, when and why mace was used, the words that were exchanged, whether or not someone was using the N-word, whether or not Kyle had a knife, and whether or not Zoellner was even conscious at the time of the stabbing.

The story begins at 9:44.

Also covered

Crime updates, court dates for big cases, HACHR keeps working to reduce overdose deaths, Humboldt’s polluted beach problem, a scary attempted exorcism, better teeth, Humboldt’s new famous baby zebra, a tribute to how lucky we are, poll results, and much more.


Saturday, June 10, 2017

Poll: Firefighter cannot wear Black Lives Matter pin on uniform; Humboldt’s last week of news

Episode sponsored by Eel River Brewing, Bongo Boy Studio, and Los Bagels.


In the latest episode of Humboldt Last Week (11:48): A local firefighter filed a grievance after his boss asked him to stop wearing a Black Lives Matter pin on his uniform. Humboldt Bay Fire’s uniform policy says you can wear lapel pins as long as they’re “fire service related and in good taste”. At a hearing the Humboldt Bay Fire Joint Powers Authority Board of Directors ultimately forbid him from wearing the pin saying it was politically divisive and not related to firefighting.

Matt McFarland was the firefighter fighting this decision. He said he was aiming for inclusiveness, free speech, and he wanted people of color to feel comfortable calling the fire department in Eureka. McFarland and his supporters said Black Lives Matter is a social movement, an extension of civil rights, and it should not be considered controversial.

Humboldt Bay Fire Chief Bill Gillespie’s official response to McFarland’s grievance partially said “a (public employee’s) uniform is not a venue for freedom of speech.”

Eureka City Councilmember Austin Allison is one of the Directors who made the decision to disallow the uniform pin who noted he’s personally a supporter of the Black Lives Matter movement but their decision was strictly a matter of policy. In a post he echoed his belief that Black Lives Matter could be politically divisive.

“...This decision has nothing to do with the movement itself, but I am glad this issue was raised about racial injustice in our community,” he wrote. “We as directors of Humboldt Bay Fire have work to do in regards to reaffirm that Humboldt Bay Fire’s mission is to serve the public to our utmost ability despite any color, creed, or religion...”

It was reported by the Lost Coast Outpost that outgoing Eureka Police Chief Andy Mills was the one who pointed out the pin to the fire chief. McFarlands wife sent a photo to the blog of Mills wearing a Police Lives Matter bracelet. Mills said the difference was that the bracelet is not a part of his uniform and when asked he said he’d be okay with his officers wearing Black Lives Matter bracelets. At the hearing Mills stood firm saying allowing a Black Lives Matter pin on a public employee's uniform would open things up for others to wear polarizing pins supporting say the NRA or the pro-life movement.

Some in the community have said a public servant showing support for a part of our community is not offensive and allowing the pin would be a positive step for public relations -- that there’s nothing political about standing up against racism.

Others have said that while some Black Lives Matter affiliates are simply supporting civil rights, others support violent, damaging, or separatist views. They believe politics should be left off the uniforms of public servants.

What do you think? Should policy allow a public servant to wear a Black Lives Matter pin on their uniform?

Vote in the poll below. It will be active until June 16.

The story starts at 11:48.


Should policy allow a public servant to wear a Black Lives Matter pin on their uniform?

Yes
No

Also covered

An update on the tragic murder of HSU student David Josiah Lawson, a former restaurateur and substitute teacher pleads not guilty to pedophilia-related charges, Jevin Kitchen is doing amazing things as a track star, comment sections under fire, the EPD chief accepted a job in Santa Cruz, a man was Rice Krispies Treated at the hospital, hacking Russians, Pepsi is iced from HSU, upcoming events, and much more.


Saturday, June 3, 2017

Child abuse and neglect handled poorly, says grand jury; Humboldt’s last week of news

Episode sponsored by Bongo Boy Studio, Jitter Bean Coffee Co. and Los Bagels.

In the latest episode of Humboldt Last Week (9:50): After an eight-month investigation Humboldt County’s Civil Grand Jury released reports suggesting there are significant problems with the way allegedly abused and neglected children are protected here.

With the analysis setting sights on the Sheriff’s Office, the Office of Education, and mainly Child Welfare Services (CWS), vulnerable kids are potentially falling through the cracks. Some notable takeaways? Questioned accusations of cops ratting out schools to families for filing reports, schools allegedly not archiving reports in the interest of anonymity allowing kids with multiple incidents to go unnoticed, and CWS not following up on over half of their 2,859 incident reports in 2015 and 2016. It’s said in the majority of the cases not followed up on by CWS -- who are under investigation by the California Attorney General’s Office -- reporters or victims were not contacted.

“There’s major communications issues between many of the players involved with dealing with child abuse investigations,” said Times Standard reporter Will Houston, who has been covering the grand jury reports in-depth. “It appears that under-staffing and high turnover at (CWS) is playing a pretty large role into that… Now it seems that within the start of this year some movement is going forward in terms of efforts to improve communications and efforts to improve and meet current protocol.”

In the podcast Houston discusses what he's learned so far from Sheriff William Honsal, Superintendent of Schools Chris Hartley, grand jury foreman James Glover, those overseeing CWS, the state Attorney General's Office, and others.

According to the grand jury report Humboldt County spends $6.3 million annually to help abused, neglected and emotionally harmed children. Some solutions offered up by the grand jury? Developing a way to rate how the those involved are handling these cases, getting those involved to respond to child abuse and neglect faster, obtaining enough capable staff, and generally improving communication all around. It’s been said CWS is already making major changes, for example they are now connecting hotline callers directly to social workers.

The Sheriff’s Office, the Office of Education and Child Welfare Services are all required to submit responses to these reports within 60 to 90 days of the reports being received.

The story begins at 9:50.

Also covered

Crime, a crazy dog bite, more car races, the women-only showing of “Wonder Woman,” more sweet words from Sara Bareilles per usual, a bill to extend last call, trauma care designations for some local hospitals, and much more.